I’m back from my very memorable sculpture trip to China from March 25 to April 11. For the first week, I was working with my Vancouver Sculpture Studio partner, Geemon Xin Meng, at a workshop in Quyang, about 200 km south of Beijing in Hebei province. This area is famous for its history of marble sculpture going back millennia as well as for some of the worst air pollution in all of China. I spent time preppring my maquettes that I had brought with me for enlargement into marble and I also tried my hand at sculpting directly into marble. Below are photos of this time as well as of a temple complex and a school and studio in nearby Yangping.

ellen scobie working on sculpture in qu yang, china

At work on my sculpture at the studio in Quyang, lying all around are marble stones waiting to be made into sculptures. We were working in an open yard next to a busy road so I wore head, ear, eye and mouth protection all day! Gloves, too, usually if they didn’t get in the way of working on fine detail. (Qu Yang, China)

 

sculptor ellen scobie works on marble bear sculpture in china

Working on my small, marble sculpture of a bear. It was the first time I’d worked on stone and I was being so careful not to take away too much. Stone is not like clay where you can simply add or remove clay at whim!

 

Vancouver Sculpture Studio visit to China

Discussing sculpture with Geemon at the Beiyue Temple in Quyang, China. The air quality was so bad we wore our respiratory masks around as a matter of course. These temples have been part of Beiyue culture since the feudal dynasty, Shun Zhi (1660), where they were an important place for the Emperors to make ritual offerings.

 

Cherry blossoms in full bloom at the Beiyue Temple

Cherry blossoms in full bloom at the Beiyue Temple

 

Vancouver Sculpture Studio visit to China

This is a nearby sculpture school in Yangping that we visited on the weekend so there were no students around. 15-18 year olds are being trained as sculpture assistants to copy traditional Chinese sculpture. There is a huge market within China for these sculptures.

 

Vancouver Sculpture Studio visit to China

These giant sculptures are made of marble imported from the south of China. The ubiquitous lion has a female and male form: the female has her left paw raised under which is a cub she’s protecting; the male has his right paw on top of a ball, because he’s always playing! As you can see, we did get some blue skies which the locals told us occurred only rarely.

 

Vancouver Sculpture Studio visit to China

This is how a stainless steel sculpture gets made. Individual sheets of stainless steel are bent by hand and fitted over the mold. The pieces are then welded together. Afterwards the welds will be polished out and the whole sculpture will seen as a gleaming piece of steel.

 

Vancouver Sculpture Studio visit to China

This small temple is made from the local marble which is orange in colour.

 

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